Kymn Anderson, Executive Director of the Faribault Foundation was in Central Park Wednesday evening with her husband Jim working on getting a Message Board ready for the upcoming Blue Collar Festival.

The Message Board is on the 2nd Avenue side of the park, open to everyone to stop by and post.  They were clearing off old messages to make way for new ones.

#Post your Pride, #Post your Gratitude, #Post Possibilities.

Tags and markers are on the south side of the board across the street from the historica Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour. The Andersons took down the messages that had filled the board and there were scores and scores of awesome thoughts shared about what people appreciated about the Faribault community.

Faribault's giving spirit to help others is at the heart of what I love about the community and I can see many people agree.  The community was founded by Alexander Faribault who was a philanthropist in every sense of the word.

To have the Message Board so close to the Cathedral where Bishop Henry Whipple preached inclusion before, during and after the Dakota War is appropriate.

The former Vohs Floor Store in downtown Faribault used to have a sign in their window stating the questions What Would Whipple Do?  Another great example of philanthropy for us all.

How many of us would spend our own money to take a train from Faribault to Washington, D.C. to urge then President Abraham Lincoln not to execute hundreds upon hundreds of Native Americans.

According to the Minnesota State Historical Society, "In the early years of his episcopate, Whipple's espousal of Indian reform and commitment to Indian missions earned him the enmity of many whites who hated Indians, and led some of his fellow bishops to look upon him as a fanatic. "

"His attitude was denounced most bitterly after the U.S-Dakota War of 1862 when in appeals to the President and in the public press, he opposed wholesale executions and extermination or deportation of the Dakota."

After Bishop Whipple's visit President Lincoln stated, "He came here the other day and talked with me about the rascality of this Indian business until I felt it down to my boots."

The Mission Statement of the Faribault Foundation is Promoting philanthropy to enhance the quality of life in Faribault for everyone.

Recent Community Pride Grants provided by the Foundation include:

  • Concerts in the Park
  • IRIS- Infants Remembered in Silence
  • Life jackets at the Aquatic Center
  • Faribault Deaf Club
  • Family Stage at Blue Collar BBQ Festival
  • Oak Ridge Cemetery
  • Ruth's House Transportation
  • Heritage Days
  • Warm Our Community- Faribault Rotary Club
  • Buddy Benches
  • Paradise Center-Modern Opera
  • Tilt-a-Whirl display
  • Food Access Van
  • LGVTQ Support
  • Cathedral Care
  • Eid Celebration

Scores and scores of messages filled the board and I snapped photos of a few of them.  They will be shared below.

You are asked to write what you are most proud of in Faribault.  What you are most grateful for or jot down what you hope for in the future of our community.  You could do all three.

Messages will be compiled in a report after the project.  You can follow the Faribault Foundation on Facebook to see photos and post additional messages.

Anderson says, "After the year we have had, we all need positive messages from everyone in the community!  Pass the word! Join in!

In some of the photos you can see a bag on the ground that was filled with the message tags so these are a tiny sample of what has been shared.

The Faribault Foundations is appreciative of the following given Special thanks on the Message Board.

  • Thrivent
  • Faribault Park and Recreation
  • Chadderdon Lumber
  • Sherwin Williams
  • Insty-Prints
  • Caron Fence
  • Dave Albers- volunteer builder

I did see several messages of appreciation for the newest mural and all the murals in downtown Faribault.

What home would you guess would represent Minnesota?

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Faribault would definitely be on my list.  How about yours?

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